RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <set eval="<date part=second>" variable="start_s">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <set eval="<date part=minute>" variable="start_m">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <set eval="<date part=hour>" variable="start_t">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <set eval="<countdown seconds since iso=1997-12-01>" variable="surfer_time">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="accept_index is 0">
 | <if variable="accept_index is 0">
Scanian culture and language (the s.c.nordic FAQ)
nordic flags
The home pages for the Usenet newsgroup soc.culture.nordic
RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">

<< -

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">
- >>

Scanian culture and language

 

7.6.6 Culture

<This section by Malte Lewan>
Scania is associated (mostly nationally) with certain hallmarks like some types of food: the goose, the smoked eel ("røgad åol") and "spettkaka" (Swedish spelling) that is a type of cake. Other associations many people get (and also used in the tourist business) are the clogs a lot of people wear even today and the folk costumes containing a certain distinctive pale yellow color, with the men wearing pants reaching just below the knee followed by white socks. The women have kerchiefs instead of hats when they are married. The colors of the dresses are dark. The would-be "jacket" of the dress is one part with the skirt and not separate. The clothings mark richness with silver and many visible skirts. The folk costumes are based on the farmers' rather than for example the fishers' Sunday dresses. They differ of course from hundred ("härad") to hundred but keep certain characteristics in common.

Lately, the Danish red sausage, the "pølse", has made it into the outdoor food commerce. It was for a long time not allowed in Sweden due to the added ingredients making the sausage red. When it finally became allowed, this was looked upon like a great success of the local politicians. Maybe because of the Scanian habit of eating this sausage when visiting København, it has now become very popular in Scania too. In Lund, there is another sausage called "lundaknake" that has reached fame, at least locally.

The willows that edges many Scanian roads give the landscape a characteristic outlook. Scania is like Denmark very flat and without much of forests except in the north (in fact, this was the natural divider before 1658 between Denmark and Sweden). The willows are supposed to shelter against the wind in an environment where no other natural shelters exist. Also, the Scanian mills ("möllor") are typical for the province. Often situated on hills, they too characterize the horizon in the Scanian scenery.

Being a region containing one eighth of the population in Sweden, there exist of course a great number of nationally famous Scanians, some of these comedians and singers. There will not be a list here, but the maybe most famous Scanian, the most Scanian Scanian will be mentioned. His name was Edward Persson and was the main character and very much dominating personality in a number of film comedies taken place on some farm in south western Skåne, in Söderslätt. He more or less established the image of the Scanian person: fat (!), slow, content with life, feeling secure and of course having the accent considered strong in those days of television. He's dead since some years now.

Scanians have often got a bad reputation in Sjælland for going there to get drunk. The background is different state policies when it comes to the selling of alcohol. While this is harshly regulated in Sweden and only sold in certain stores with high prices, it's cheaper and much more easily accessible in Denmark. The result is irritation between the former fellow countrymen.

 

<< -

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">
Sweden - >>


7.6.7 Language

<This section by Malte Lewan>
The old language of the province has many resemblences to Danish but has also many unique features that would make it problematic to simply call it a Danish dialect. In the very south west, the language could be said to be Danish but the heart land is filled with unparalleled features and related words so different from both Danish and Swedish that they ordinarily aren't recognizable to either group of speakers.

Until the 19th century, the language was unaltered by significant influence of both Danish (until 1658) and Swedish (from that year and onwards). But in the middle and end of that century, the Swedish language started to persuade vital parts of the population. In the beginning of the 20th century most people still spoke the old language, but that majority diminished faster and faster. Today, the percentage is probably in the one digits and this group of inhabitants consists mainly of older people though there are some young bilingual people as well. The language these persons speak is even usually softly Swedified (where for example the most Swedish of two alternatives in the old language regularly gets chosen) and examples of folks today speaking an untouched old Scanian is probably very scarce.

What is spoken by most today is a dialect of Swedish, but many speakers show differences that are more or less noticable depending on the person. For example:

The type of widely spread strongly dialectal Scanian that there exists today can be quite difficult even for Swedish speakers to understand. It's probably as commonly used among young people as among older ones. It's alive to another extent than the old language and is a Swedish influenced version of it, with the many parts sensitive to external domination left out. Even in this dialect, there are several examples of grammatical differences and there are a few hundreds of local words still in use all over the province by many people. Just ten examples:
Scanian     English         Swedish
hutta     = throw            (Sw: kasta)
klyddig   = complicated      (Sw: besvärlig)
lässa     = load, put up     (Sw: lasta, lägga upp)
mölla     = mill             (Sw: kvarn)
nimm      = neat             (Sw: praktisk, lätt)
påg       = boy              (Sw: pojke)
rälig     = ugly, mean       (Sw: ful, stygg, otäck)
sammedant = likewise         (Sw: likadant)
titt      = often            (Sw: ofta)
töj       = clothes          (Sw: kläder)


Sources: Newspaper articles from "Sydsvenska Dagbladet", 1992-95



RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if variable="print is 1">
© Copyright 1996-2001 by Malte Lewan.
You are free to quote this page as long as you mention the URL.
The line of flags is modified after a picture at det Åländska skoldatanätet.
This page was last updated June the 27th in the year of 1998.

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">

RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <if variable="print is 1">
 | <if not="not" variable="print is 1">
RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <insert variable="start_t">
&scn_m0=
RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <insert variable="start_m">
&scn_s0=
RXML parse error: No current scope.
 | <insert variable="start_s">
&scn_y=2022&scn_m=1&scn_d=26&scn_f=/nordic/scn/faq766.html&scn_r=">